Six Main Sources of Retirement Income

A woman and a man dance outsideFor many people, retirement income may come from a variety of sources. Here’s a quick review of the six main sources:

Social Security
Social Security is the government-administered retirement income program. Workers become eligible after paying Social Security taxes for 10 years. Benefits are based on each worker’s 35 highest earning years. If there are fewer than 35 years of earnings, non-earning years are averaged in as zero. In 2017, the average monthly benefit was estimated at $1,360.¹

Personal Savings and Investments
Personal savings and investments outside of retirement plans can provide income during retirement. Retirees tend to go for investments that offer monthly guaranteed income over potential returns.²

Individual Retirement Accounts
Traditional IRAs have been around since 1974. Contributions you make to a traditional IRA may be fully or partially deductible, depending on your individual circumstances. Distributions from a traditional IRA are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty. Generally, once you reach age 70½, you must begin taking required minimum distributions.

Roth IRAs were created in 1997. Roth IRA contributions cannot be made by taxpayers with high incomes. To qualify for the tax-free and penalty-free withdrawal of earnings, Roth IRA distributions must meet a five-year holding requirement and occur after age 59½. Tax-free and penalty-free withdrawal also can be taken under certain other circumstances, such as a result of the owner’s death. The original Roth IRA owner is not required to take minimum annual withdrawals. Future tax laws can change at any time and may impact the benefits of Roth IRAs. Their tax treatment may change.

Defined Contribution Plans
Many workers are eligible to participate in a defined–contribution plan such as a 401(k), 403(b), or 457 plan. Eligible workers can set aside a portion of their pre-tax income into an account, which then accumulates tax deferred.

Distributions from defined contribution plans are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty. Generally, once you reach age 70½, you must begin taking required minimum distributions.

Defined Benefit Plans
Defined benefit plans are “traditional” pensions—employer–sponsored plans under which benefits, rather than contributions, are defined. Benefits are normally based on factors such as salary history and duration of employment. The number of traditional pension plans has dropped dramatically during the past 30 years.

Continued Employment
In a recent survey, 68% of workers stated that they planned to keep working in retirement. In contrast, only 26% of retirees reported that continued employment was a major or minor source of retirement income.³

Member Investment Services, located at DuPont Community Credit Union, is available to help. Please schedule a free appointment by emailing us at misdccu@lpl.com or calling 540.946.3200.

1. Social Security Administration, 2017
2. Insured Retirement Institute, April 2018
3. Employee Benefits Research Institute, 2018

Securities offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor, Member FINRA/SPIC. Insurance products offered through LPL Financial or its licensed affiliates. The investment products sold through LPL Financial are not insured DuPont Community Credit Union deposits and are not NCUA insured. These products are not obligations of the DuPont Community Credit Union and are not endorsed, recommended or guaranteed by DuPont Community Credit Union or any government agency. The value of the investment may fluctuate, the return on the investment is not guaranteed, and loss of principle is possible. DuPont Community Credit Union and Member Investment Services are not registered broker/dealers and are not affiliated with LPL Financial.
Content in this material is for general information only and not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

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